Maripol Shot Rock: The Photographer On Her Polaroid of Madonna

 © Maripol, Madonna, Danceteria, New York City, 1983
Maripol with son, Lino

By Maripol

When I arrived in New York from France, still fresh from the École des Beaux-Arts school of arts, I didn’t have a clue what an artist was supposed to do. Being a girl, I loved fashion and I loved to make accessories. I also really loved to snap photos with my Polaroid SX 70 camera. It was pretty much like my clutch bag.

I first met Madonna one night in 1983, a time when the music scene was amidst change: disco had just died, Hip-hop and rap were on the rise and clubs like the Roxy and Danceteria were showcasing a great mix of performers.

On that night, Fab 5 Freddy was about to take the stage at the Roxy and he asked me to recruit some cute girls to dance with him up on stage. I spotted Madonna, whom I knew from the city’s club scene, hanging out with my good friend Jean-Michel Basquiat. I asked her if she was wearing a nice bra and if she minded taking her top off to dance on stage. She thought I was out of my mind…and the rest is history.

I shot this Polaroid right before Madonna’s own performance in 1983 - at Danceteria. She was very young but just as gorgeous as she still is today. There is only one Polaroid like it that captures this moment. I love the way she looks at me and also love seeing her lips through the glass while she drank (her favorite drink was a dry Martini). The cigarette in the photo is not lit. We all smoked back then but we also liked them for attitude.

The image captures a couple of my fixations: fashion & accessories – all with another love of mine: my Polaroid camera.

I am delighted to share this private moment in such a great show like Who Shot Rock & Roll with the public.

See More of Maripol's images in Who Shot Rock & Roll, showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography through October 7, 2012. Learn more about her on her official website.

Albert Watson Shot Rock: The Photographer on His Photo of Michael Jackson

 © Albert Watson

By Albert Watson

This was the first and only time I worked with Michael Jackson. We were booked for a two-day shoot for the Invincible album cover and some inside photos. The shooting was divided into one day of portraits and one day of dance shots at my studio in New York.

I already owned a mirror rig that allowed me to adjust eight mirrors individually. And, of course, before Michael arrived, the mirrors and lighting were completely prepared on the set. To give Michael more flexibility (and to add a little fun) I gave him what was essentially a stripper's pole on a white Plexi stage. When he arrived on the set, Michael spent two or three minutes stretching and then started dancing in front of the mirrors to "Billie Jean," which we played over the studio stereo system. Because of the set-up and the preparation, it was hard not to get some magical shots in almost every frame during the roughly 30 minutes he danced in front of the camera. This was Michael Jackson dancing, after all. How could you go wrong?

I found Michael charming, cooperative, totally professional, and a pleasure to deal with. The shooting was actually quite easy. After seeing the contact sheets from the shoot, the final print was essentially one gigantic contact sheet. From far away, the print looks almost like a piece of wallpaper, but close up, it gives you a very good idea of the entire shooting, and the charisma and power of Michael's dancing."

See more of Albert's images in Who Shot Rock & Roll, showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography through October 21, 2012. Learn more about him on his website at www.albertwatson.net.

'Who Shot Rock & Roll: The Film Goes To Tribeca

We're very excited and proud to announce that The Annenberg Space for Photography’s original exhibition documentary, WHO SHOT ROCK & ROLL: The Film, has been selected as an official entry in the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival. The short film will be in the category of "Shorts in Competition: Documentary." You may recall the film was part of last summer's record-breaking show, WHO SHOT ROCK & ROLL and features photographs, interviews and behind the scenes footage with acclaimed photographers Ed Colver, Henry Diltz, Jill Furmanovsky, Lynn Goldsmith, Bob Gruen, Norman Seeff, Mark Seliger and Guy Webster. as well as musicians Henry Rollins, Debbie Harry, Noel Gallagher and several others.

WHO SHOT ROCK & ROLL: THE FILM will screen for the public over several days at the Tribeca Film Festival.

For more information about tickets for press or the general public click here.

Public Screening Schedule    Date       Time     Venue
Premiere Screening 4/20/2013 12:00 PM         AV71
2nd Screening 4/23/2013 9:30 PM         CCC9
3rd Screening 4/26/2013 7:00 PM           CCC5
4th Screening 4/28/2013 5:00 PM           TC2
       
Press & Industry Screening Schedule    Date Time    Venue
Press Screening 4/23/2013 10:30 AM     CCC9

Screening Venues

Chelsea Clearview Cinemas (CCC5 & 9)
260 West 23rd Street
(between 7th and 8th Avenues)
New York, NY 10011

AMC Village 7 (AV7-1)

66 Third Avenue @ 11th Street
New York, NY 10003

Tribeca Cinemas (TC2)
54 Varick Street
(Below Canal Street, at Laight Street)
New York, NY 10013

Last year, our short film Beauty Culture screened at Tribeca.

Watch the trailer for WHO SHOT ROCK & ROLL: The FIlm here.

Henry Rollins Rocks IRIS Nights

It was an honor to have Henry Rollins take part in IRIS Nights last night. Rollins spoke about his travels around the globe and the photographs he took of the different people and cultures during those trips. The Photography Space was packed - standing room only! One of those in the crowd was featured photographer, Ed Colver, whose photo of Rollins greets visitors as on an oversized layover on the front door of our building.

Rollins, Colver, and his giant image of the rocker on the door in the same place at the same time? That's a rare moment so there was only one thing we could do: post-lecture, we had Rollins and Colver pose in front of the door and we got the cool shot above!

We'll have Rollins' lecture on our site soon and Colver himself will take the IRIS Nights stage in September.

Photo by Unique Nicole for the Space.

Spotted at the Space: Diane Keaton

Does that face look familiar? It should. That's Diane Keaton, who stopped by to take in Who Shot Rock & Roll before the show ends next month. The Hollywood legend said she loved the exhibit and the accompanying orginal film. Keaton (seen here with our very own ASP legend, Marissa), gracisouly agreed to pose for a picture but wanted to stand in front of the Elvis Presley (she must be a big fan!) video which greets guests as they enter the Space. Glad you enjoyed the exhibit, Diane!

Announcing Our Meet & Greet Series!

Musician, author, photographer and previous Iris Nights lecturer Henry Rollins returns to the Annenberg Space for Photography this Saturday to kick off our Meet & Greet series. This brand new program will allow visitors to interact with photographers, photo editors and other guests at Skylight Studios, our recently opened multi-media venue located directly across from the Space for Photography. Unlike the Iris Nights lectures, the format for each Meet & Greet event will vary by photographer but no matter the format, attendees will have the opportunity to interact one-on-one with the featured guest.

Our first set of Meet & Greet events will include some of the legendary artists featured in Who Shot Rock & Roll: The Film. In addition to Rollins, photographers Ed Colver, Guy Webster and Norman Seeff will be part of our inaugural Meet & Greet slate. Check our weekly Iris Nights enewsletters for details. After the Meet & Greet, stick around to watch Who Shot Rock & Roll: The Film, which screens throughout the day at Skylight Studios.

Rollins' Meet & Greet will take place on Saturday, August 10 from 2-3pm. Rollins has spent over three decades traveling to over 80 countries and always keeps a camera close at hand. During the event, he will discuss his photographic work, share why he goes where he goes and what happens when he gets there. Rollins will also sign copies of one of his book Occupants, which will be available for purchase.

The Meet & Greet series is free, and no reservations are required. Please note that photographers will only sign items available for purchase at Skylight Studios.

Upcoming Meet & Greet events are below:

Henry Rollins
August 10 from 2-3pm

Ed Colver
August 17 from 1-3pm

Guy Webster
August 25 from 1-3pm

Norman Seeff
September 7 from 1-3pm

Coming This Summer: 'Who Shot Rock & Roll?'

We're very excited about our next exhibit, Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955 to the Present! The show, which features 166 prints by over 100 photographers, was originally shown and created by the Brooklyn Museum. The summer exhibit will include an original documentary Annenberg Space for Photography film (as we always do) with interviews and behind-the-scenes footage of photographers Ed Colver, Henry Diltz, Jill Furmanovsky, Lynn Goldsmith, Bob Gruen, Norman Seeff, Mark Seliger and Guy Webster. There'll also be appearances by rock stars Alice Cooper and Henry Rollins. Click here for more information. Mark June 23 down on your calendar!

Portugal. The Man At Who Shot Rock & Roll: Live

Who Shot Rock & Roll: Live continued over the weekend with the second of three concerts we are presenting with KCRW - and what a show it was! The night served to bring people together to celebrate music and photography  as well as commemorate the 40th anniversary of T. Rex's influential album The Slider - all for free! Portugal. The Man put on an amazing show - one that people were still talking about days afterward.

Droves of people filled the park outside of the Annenberg Space for Photography.

Everyone was in good spirits at this all ages show. Some adults even let out their more youthful and care-free side.

There was a line to enter to see the Who Shot Rock & Roll photography exhibit all day long.

One of the exhibit's featured photographers, Ed Colver, who also attended the Moby concert earlier this month, showed up with his lovely wife Karin.

Before the show, the members of Portugal. The Man came up to the Annenberg Foundation to play for a live televised news segment.

KCRW DJs Dan Wilcox & Gary Calamar began the entertainment part of the night by spinning some records.

The crowd had a good time listening to music...

...and dancing!

A concertgoer proudly shows off his newly purchased Who Shot Rock & Roll t-shirt!

Portugal. The Man came on stage shortly after 8 o'clock playing their own songs as well as covers of T. Rex tunes.

The band has even compiled their own YouTube video playlist inspired by the exhibit.

The crowd - really energized by the music!

The band ended their fantastic hour and a half-long set with a lively rendition of the Beatles' "Hey Jude."

Thanks to everyone who came out to this magical night to enjoy rock & roll images and rock & roll music. Our third (and final!) show in the free concert series with Band of Skulls & Raphael Saadiq will be Saturday, August 4. Find more information about that night here.

(All images by Unique Nicole for the Space)

David Corio Shot Rock: The Photographer on His Image of Chrissie Hynde

Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders, Nashville Rooms, London © David Corio

By David Corio

The Nashville Room was a big grotty venue on the corner of Cromwell Road and North End Row in West Kensington. It was a music mecca in the 1970s where many bands including the Sex Pistols, The Police, U2 and Joy Division got some of their first shows. This was an early gig for The Pretenders and Chrissie Hynde was already making a name for herself as she was close to several hip music journalists. I hadn’t been commissioned but was curious about the band as they were generating so much buzz. As with many of the shows here it was packed and the heat was almost unbearable. It was best to arrive early, particularly on a cold night as it could take ages for the camera lenses to warm up and lose their condensation. There is nothing more frustrating than being at a show and only being able to get soft focus photos.

As usual the small stage lights weren't very bright so I uprated my Tri-X film to 1600ASA to avoid camera shake and blur. It was virtually impossible to squeeze to the front of the tiny stage and with so many heads in the way the only alternative was to climb onto a table and balance on it to get a better vantage point. It gave me a clear view before being pushed off after about ten minutes but I managed to shoot half a roll of film - quite a luxury.

By this stage the music scene was being labeled 'post punk' and it was easier to take photos during this time than it was during punk's heyday a year or so earlier when the audience would be pogo dancing and spitting at the stage. Invariably being at the front photographers would come out the worse for wear. That is part of the punk scene I don't miss at all!

See David Corio's other images in Who Shot Rock & Roll, currently showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography. To learn more about the photographer and his work visit his official website.

Watch The Who Shot Rock & Roll Video Teaser

"I want my MTV?" Not this summer when the new music catchphrase will be "I want my ASP." Via the above 30 second video teaser, take a peek at what you'll see when Who Shot Rock & Roll rolls into the Annenberg Space for Photography this summer. Mark your calendars for opening day: June 23.

Pages

Copyright © 2014. The Annenberg Space for Photography. All rights reserved.
Privacy & Accessibility Statement
Sitemap