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Nikki Sixx Rocks The Space

A bona fide rock star lecturer, Mötley Crüe bass guitarist NIkki Sixx, rocked IRIS Nights last night! Some people may not be aware but bass guitar isn't the only instrument Nikki takes seriously - cameras also play a large role in his life.

Visitors lined up outside of the Space well before doors opened at 6pm.

Joining Nikki for this lecture was journalist and author Kristine McKenna. The long-time Los Angeles music writer did a stellar job picking Nikki's brain about his photography in a revealing and candid discussion.

Nikki told Kristine that he has been photographing for over 30 years but started to take it more seriously in 1989. Quite impressively, he's completely self-taught in the medium.

Nikki told a poignant story about the Coney Island clown in this photo. He told Nikki said that most people took his picture because he was a "freak" but felt that this image captured his outer beauty.

Nikki doesn't believe beauty is only defined in the pages of People magazine's "100 Most Beautiful People" issue. He reiterated throughout the talk that beauty is everywhere: "being an individual is so rewarding."

Here's a recent photo taken by Nikki of a female teenage fan paying homage to the rock star by replicating one of his looks from the 1980s. Check out a photo of vintage Nikki here.

Kristine asked Nikki about the kind of cameras he uses in his photography and he revealed that he uses everything from Holgas to Leicas. But he stressed that it doesn't matter what kind of camera you use to take pictures. Use the best tool in your hand to capture the moment!

Nikki takes loads of self portraits. Why? According to him it's simply because no one else is ever around!

While Nikki said he doesn't feel ready to publicly exhibit his photos quite yet (he'd like to first nail down a theme), we can't wait until the time comes.

Nikki's girlfriend, model Courtney Bingham, was also in the audience. As his muse of sorts, Nikki said that she has inspired him to start to dabble in fashion photography.

Annenberg Foundation executive director Leonard Aube stopped by for a post-lecture chat.

Nikki couldn't resist adding his own answer to the white board question about beauty and age located in our workshop area.

Nikki showed us tonight that not only is he a rock star in the music world but a rock star photographer as well! Thank you Nikki and Kristine for an awesome night!

For more information about Nikki's photography, visit his tumblr site.

(All lecture images by Unique for the Space)

The Space Honored By Julius Shulman Institute

Last month, the Annenberg Space for Photography was the recent recipient of a great honor. We were awarded the 2011 Julius Shulman Communication Award, which honors an outstanding contributor and exponent of communication in his or her field. The award is handed out each year by the Julius Shulman Institute at Woodbury University. Gil Garcetti, Diane Keaton and the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels have all been past winners.

Thanks to all of you, our visitors, who have helped make the Photography Space such a great success. We wouldn't be where we are without you!

Above is classic shot of the Space taken the year we opened. The photographer? Julius Shulman himself!

IRIS Nights Sneak Peek: Alex Kuczynski

As we enter our final weeks of BEAUTY CULTURE here at the Annenberg Space for Photography, one of the most frequently asked questions from visitors who watch our feature documentary continues to be "Who is that woman in the pearls and blue dress?" The woman whose statements have left such a lasting impression on visitors is our November 17th IRIS Night lecturer, journalist and author, Alex Kuczynski.

Since Kuczynski will grace us with her presence, along with photographer (and previous IRIS Night lecturer) Susan Anderson, during our final IRIS Night lecturers during the run of BEAUTY CULTURE, it's a great time to learn more about "the woman in the pearls."

The ambition that would ultimately lead to Kuczynski's success as an award-winning author and reporter appears to run in the family. Her father, Pedro, was a candidate in last year's Presidential election in Peru. John Casey, The National Book Award Winner and novelist, is her maternal uncle. Kuczynski, however, isn't interested in resting on family laurels. Carving out a name for herself as a reporter for The New York Times, she took it one step further and authored an uninhibited, behind-the-scenes examination of the cosmetic surgery industry in her book, Beauty Junkies.

Beauty Junkies is a revealing view at what is now a demographic-defying $15 billion fixation on youth and physical vitality. In a recent article for Harper's Bazaar, Kuczynski sums up the obsession saying, "The pressure to stay young, and to remain young looking, is at a fever pitch in America. Those seeking the holy grail of youth are driving up the number of cosmetic procedures—with Americans getting more than 13 million of them every year—in their quest for a smooth forehead and taut cheekbones."

In her book and featured role in the BEAUTY CULTURE documentary, Kuczynski readily admits to experimenting with a few cosmetic procedures in her 20s and 30s, but ultimately realized that "Living out west [in Idaho] has made me release all the ideas I used to have about success, including the quest for that perfect age-defying forehead. In fact, I've discovered that the more I give up, the greater the reward. I stopped trying to think I could do it all—and in part, I was forced to....you can't worry about your hair or your skin because the one practicing dermatologist in our town doesn't even do Botox."

We hope you'll be joining us for our final IRIS Night lecture with "the woman in the pearls" Alex Kuczynski and High Glitz photographer, Susan Anderson on November 17th for what is certain to be an entertaining and very enlightening conversation. If not, you'll still have a few days to visit BEAUTY CULTURE one more time before its closing day on Sunday, November 27th. We hope to see you soon here at the Space!

Spotted At The Space: Janice Dickinson

Model Janice Dickinson was one of the thousands of visitors to the Photography Space this past weekend during the final days of BEAUTY CULTURE. Dickinson, whose image by Greg Gorman was in the show (see it here in the print exhibition slideshow), was kind enough to pose in front of the Digital Salon which used her face as its entryway. Thanks, Janice, for stopping by the show and thanks to all of you who made the show such a great success!

Grace Jones is Chris Levine's 'Superstar'

For Grace Jones' 2009 "The Hurricane Tour," "Digital Darkroom" photographer Chris Levine designed an element of the show in which a laser shined at the lustrous Swarovski crystal-encrusted bowler hat the singer wore during her performance of "Love is the Drug." This created a surreal and magical effect on stage that mesmerized the audience. Levine recreated the moment for his stunning photograph of Jones, entitled Superstar, which is above,

Said Chris about the moment in the show: "I got the Royal Festival Hall (in London) to take all lights to black out when we did it first time. The laser coming directly down from above onto (her) crystal headpiece...the audience went wild. It was a magical moment-a kind of flash point. Grace was back! It has to be one of the best live shows I had ever seen by any artist. It was electrifying!"

Want to see for yourself how well Levine's design played out during the show? Then watch Jones' "electrifying" performance of the song in the clip below.

Bringing Attention To Important Topics Through The Use Of Humor

by Pierre Beteille I am proud to say that the Annenberg Space for Photography's "Digital Darkroom" is my very first photography exhibition. I was excited to be given the opportunity to go to the show's public opening and witness, for the first time, people react (if they reacted at all!) to my images in a public setting. I take my photographs in my apartment in France!!

by Pierre Beteille I am proud to say that the Annenberg Space for Photography's "Digital Darkroom" is my very first photography exhibition. I was excited to be given the opportunity to go to the show's public opening and witness, for the first time, people react (if they reacted at all!) to my images in a public setting. I take my photographs in my apartment in France. I mostly shoot self-portraits and work alone, without an assistant. As a result, I have no direct feedback on my work. Of course, I get comments and messages from people on the Internet, but they inevitably come only from those who are receptive to my work. Coming to Los Angeles for "Digital Darkroom" was really my first opportunity to see people's instinctive reactions - either good or bad - in person. While it may seem rather childish and narcissistic satisfaction, to see people smile and react with such pleasure to my photos brought me an incredible sense of fulfillment. My work sometimes deals with serious issues that are important to me but I try to juxtapose the more solemn subjects with humor. For example, my latest photos focus on the speculation on the cereal markets and the nuclear disaster at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster in Japan. Glamorous themes, aren't they? My goal is to make people think about these important topics without boring them or putting them off, and the only way I can accomplish this is through the use of humor or satire. Humor can sometimes be very specific to different cultures, and I was not sure that it would be perceived in the same way from one continent to another. This is why one of my fears was to see people remain indifferent to my pictures. On the day of the "Digital Darkroom" public opening, a young girl in a wheelchair visiting the Photography Space came to me and with a great big smile said to me, about my photographs, "Thank you; you made me laugh." Even if I am a big boy, I must confess that I was very moved and that it almost brought tears to my eyes. This single sentence is the most beautiful reward and the best encouragement that I could receive for my work. Thank you all for your smiles! Pierre Beteille is a self-taught talent in Paris who has an unbridled humor and wit. He takes pride in never having read a book, watched a tutorial or taken a class on photo manipulation. His digital creations are highly original, each image functioning as both a punchline and an act of rebellion. See his work in "Digital Darkroom" which runs from December 17, 2011 - May 28, 2012.

Total Immersion

by Christopher Schneberger

I've always been a storyteller as much as a photographer. A little over ten years ago I began making narrative images dealing with spirits that revisited the spaces, and sometimes the people, that were important to them in life.  My spirits were not really the scary ghosts of horror movies or campfire lore, but ethereal interlopers that would visit lonely souls among the living.   A lost daughter would appear to her still living mother, a husband might return to his widow, or a vaporous ballerina would dance for a lonesome janitor in her former studio.

I would often include specific names and dates (birth & death) for these spirits.  Viewers and collectors find these specifics curious and ask me if there was some historical, factual basis for the imagery.  At a certain point I decided I would create a much more ambitious project - somewhat of a whodunit mystery in the form of an installation.  The project revolved around a pair of twins from the early 20th century, one of whom had mysteriously died but returned in spirit form to cavort with her sister.  I wrote an elaborate backstory for this involving their family and a scientist cum photographer, Dr. Charles Addison.  The exhibition took the form of an installation - the "recreation" of Dr. Addison's studio where (as I posit) Addison photographed Regina Crosswell and her ghostly twin, Lydia.  The room had period wallpaper, curtains and the same furniture pieces seen in the photographs.  I treated the installation as a museum exhibit, replete with curatorial text recounting the story.  Not much gave any indication that it was a fictitious artistic work.  To my great surprise, and joy, many people took it as fact and wondered how I had discovered this story.

Since that time, my work has continued to explore the supernatural in ordinary life, and particularly in America in the early 20th Century.  The next story was about Frances Naylor, a legless girl who briefly developed, at the age of 13, the ability to levitate.  She floated about her home in Evanston, Illinois, and was photographed by her father, an amateur photographer.  Her mother saw the ability as a sinister manifestation and forbade her from levitating in public.  The first exhibition of the work took place in the house where the images were made.  The public could, at once, see the photographs and the exact spot where they had occurred.  As in the previous installation, this created an immersive environment that brought the audience into the story.  Again the accompanying text treated the story as fact and allowed the audience to suspend disbelief.  This further immersed them in the story.

The following tale came about through historical research.  My gallery in Chicago, Printworks, is housed in a rehabbed warehouse building that was once home to the National Candy Company.  National was even owned by Vincent Price Sr., father of the well-known actor (no kidding!).  So, I decided to tell the story of something that could have happened at the factory.  In this case, the story was that of Anna Sula, a young orphan worker who was found murdered at the factory.  Photographs later surfaced showing that Anna had telekinetic powers and participated in meetings of a private circle at the factory.  Could this have something to do with her brutal murder?  I leave it for the viewer to decide.

In addition to the elaborate story and the installation, I also immerse the viewer in the imagery by using stereo photography (3D).  My work is primarily exhibited in 2D form, but I have the ability to display it in 3D as well.  Sometimes this is in the form of View-Master reels and viewers, sometimes as antique-style stereo cards, and sometimes as anaglyph prints that require the paper red/cyan glasses.  This is the form they are currently in at "Digital Darkroom" at the Annenberg Space for Photography.

All of my major narrative works can be enjoyed at the Annenberg Space as narrated 3D slide shows.  There is a monitor booth near my framed work with displays for shows, complete with music and narration.

I am currently at work on a new series which is in color and set contemporarily.  It involves a family (husband, wife, son, daughter) who live in an older house that has a ghost who looks in on their lives.  This show will debut at Printworks in October of this year.  And I hope to show a few preview images at my IRIS Nights lecture at Annenberg on Thursday, February 16th.

Christopher Schneberger is a traditionalist and an iconoclast. He has created photographic series of both infrared and mural-sized photographs. His work often weaves a narrative tale incorporating supernatural elements. See his work in "Digital Darkroom" which runs from December 17, 2011 - May 28, 2012.

Call For Entries For The 69th POYi

As many of you know, POYi is the oldest and the most prestigious photojournalism program and competition in the world. The Photography Space has had the great pleasure of hosting the winning photographs and visual editors in this contest not once but twice over the last few years. Want to see if your photo is included in this prestigious group? You're in luck as POYi is again accepting photos as part of its 69th year in five different divisions: news, reportage, sports, editing and multimedia. But hurry as the deadline for submissions is January 12th - yes later this week!

For more information, please visit the official POYi website.

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The "Digital Darkroom" Opening - In 3D!

Here's another reason to hang on to the free 3D glasses provided to you when you visit the Space. During last month's opening gala for "Digital Darkroom," Ted Grudowski, whose impressive 3D images are featured in the exhibit, walked around the party with his own 3D camera, snapping images of the artists and partygoers. Ted has kindly provided us those photos and here they are below. Put on those 3D glasses and enjoy!

Pre-opening gala, Ted's fellow "Digital Darkroom" 3D photographer Christopher Schneberger in front of the Photography Space.

The man behind the camera - Ted Grudowski himself!

The legendary Jerry Uelsmann striking a 3D pose.

Maggie Taylor in front of her outstanding digitally manipulated work.

Annenberg Foundation Executive Director addresses the crowd gathered to celebrate the show's opening.

The excited aforementioned crowd!

3D artist Mike Pucher, right, and his proud parents.

Exhibited photographer Martine Roch, who wants to make all of us smile, gives her best 3D pose.

Guests at the gala alongside some Annenberg Foundation folks.

Pierre Beteille strikes a pose toward the end of the night.

Thanks for the images Ted! Be sure to check out other (2D!) photos from the gala we posted shortly after the opening.

(all images by Ted Grudowski)

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