• Patricia Lanza
    On Location
  • Cory Richards
    BorderLands
  • Gerd Ludwig
    Winds of Change
  • Vincent J. Musi
    Taming the Wild
  • Chris Johns
    Looking Beyond 125 Years
  • James P. Blair
    Being There
  • Jim Richardson
    Dancing Around the Teacup
  • Mark Sowa
    An Evening with NASA: Space Exploration Through the Shutter
  • Sebastian Copeland
    From Pole to Pole—The Longest Journey
  • William Albert Allard
    Five Decades
  • Liz O. Baylen
    Finding Their Voices
  • Ed Kashi
    It’s Personal
  • Kevin Hand
    Alien Oceans
  • Joe McNally
    A Life Behind the Lens
  • Mike Yamashita
    Elusive Paradise: Michael Yamashita’s Shangri-La (along the tea road to Lhasa)
  • James Balog
    THE ART & SCIENCE OF CHASING ICE
  • David Doubilet
    BELOW
  • Abelardo Morell
    The Universe Next Door
  • Maggie Steber
    Dancing on Fire: Photographs from Haiti
  • David Liittschwager
    A World in One Cubic Foot: Portraits of Biodiversity
  • Michael “Nick” Nichols
    Lions, Elephants & Giants
David Liittschwager
A World in One Cubic Foot: Portraits of Biodiversity
Thursday, November 7, 2013 6:30-8:00pm

David Liittschwager is a contributing photographer to National Geographic and other magazines. Recipient of numerous awards, Liittschwager lectures and exhibits his work in both fine art and natural history contexts.

Show more...

He will discuss his book project A World in One Cubic Foot: Portraits of Biodiversity.  This project began with a question: How much life exists in just one cubic foot? The imagined cube became a frame made of stainless steel rod that could travel and be set up in a variety of environments. Liittschwager’s goal was to photograph, as precisely and faithfully as possible, every creature that lived in or passed through the cube.

The cube’s placement determined the species list. Movement to the right or left offered a different selection. Liittschwager also traveled with a miniature photo studio. Using a white background allowed for the sharpest, best-lit likeness he was seeking. “Nature loves to hide, but I wanted to show everything.”

Show less...
Show less...

Add to: