Kirk McKoy

Kirk D. McKoy (born 1957) is the Senior Features Photo Editor and Deputy for the  Los Angeles Times.

Kirk D. McKoy (born 1957) is the Senior Features Photo Editor and Deputy for the Los Angeles Times. He has been a photojournalist for over 28 years, and is a two time Pulitzer Prize winner, for his work covering the Los Angeles riots in 1992 and the Northridge earthquake in 1994. His current responsibilities are the day-to-day photographic look and concepts for feature and news photos and design of the Los Angeles Times.

Douglas Kirkland

For five decades, Douglas Kirkland (born 1934) has photographed celebrities and fashion. His lifelong love affair with the camera, whether still or motion pictures, has been applauded with the most prestigious awards the industry can bestow, including several for lifetime achievement

For five decades, Douglas Kirkland (born 1934) has photographed celebrities and fashion. His lifelong love affair with the camera, whether still or motion pictures, has been applauded with the most prestigious awards the industry can bestow, including several for lifetime achievement.  

In a highly competitive field, Kirkland credits his success to his ability to maintain "eye contact" with clients who are very protective of how they are portrayed. "When someone comes in for a portrait session, it takes two. It's not only about me taking the picture." Just before he turned 25, Kirkland joined the staff of Look magazine. Less than three years later he found himself world famous for the sensuous photographs of Marilyn Monroe he had taken for the magazine's 25th anniversary issue.

Besides Kirkland's portraits of the rich, famous, and influential-from Charlie Chaplin to Arnold Schwarzenegger and Coco Chanel-he is also known for his work as a set photographer, having worked on more than one hundred films, most recently Australia. His book of photographs from Titanic made the best seller list. 

Kirkland's recent monograph, Freeze Frame: 5 Decades / 50 Years / 500 Photographs, was published in 2008.

Lawrence Ho

Born in Canton China in 1950, immigrated to the United States in 1972. He earned a B.A. degree in Communications from Long Beach State University in California, and began his career as a photojournalist at the  Herald Community News.

Lawrence K. Ho, born in Canton China in 1950, immigrated to the United States in 1972. He earned a B.A. degree in Communications from Long Beach State University in California, and began his career as a photojournalist at the Herald Community News. In 1986, he joined the photography staff of the Los Angeles Times, and won the Pulitzer Prize for their coverage of 1992 Los Angeles Riots and the 1994 Northridge earthquake. He lives with his wife and two sons in Los Angeles.

Lauren Greenfield

Lauren Greenfield's work features the dark side of the idealized world of stardom and celebrity.

Widely acclaimed for her intimate studies of youth culture, Lauren Greenfield's photographs probe the darker side of the idealized worlds of stardom and celebrity. Greenfield (born 1966) established the subject matter that has remained her primary focus with her landmark 1997 book, Fast Forward: Growing up in the Shadow of Hollywood, which focuses on young girls and the sub-cultures that spring from the influence of Hollywood and the recording industry. In Girl Culture, published in 2002, she documented girls' obsessions with shopping, parties, cosmetics, hair styles, body image, and rites of passage.

Greenfield's work provides an important counterpoint to the celebrity photographs of Douglas Kirkland and Greg Gorman, bursting the illusions that Hollywood is so successful in conveying. In addition to her photographic essays, Greenfield has produced two documentary films, Thin and kids + money. The latter two projects extend her attention to media's effects on boys and adults as well as girls.

Greenfield's most recent monograph, Thin, published in 2006, is an extension of her previous work on the cult of image. She intimately documents patients at an eating disorder clinic, examining the point at which an obsession with body image becomes a pathology of mental illness.

Greg Gorman

For four decades, Greg Gorman (born 1949) has photographed celebrities in his signature black and white style. "For me a photograph is most successful when it doesn't answer all the questions, and it leaves something to be desired."

For four decades, Greg Gorman (born 1949) has photographed celebrities in his signature black and white style.  "For me a photograph is most successful when it doesn't answer all the questions, and it leaves something to be desired."  From Bette Davis and Leonardo DiCaprio to David Hockney and Philip Johnson, the exquisite tonal range of Gorman's photographs invite viewers to look closer, to share a moment of intimacy and deeply felt humanity.   

Chance changed the course of Gorman's life.  "I borrowed a friend's camera in 1968 to photograph a rock concert in Kansas City, my hometown.  The next morning I processed the pictures in a friend's darkroom, and when I saw them coming up in the developer, I was hooked."  Gorman photographed the sixties rock movement, before earning a Masters in Cinematography from USC. In the 1970s, he began to photograph the new generation of actors, many of whom went on to become world famous. He further expanded his photographic interests to include music videos, advertising, documentaries, and nudes.  

Gorman's recent monograph, The Odes to Pindar, a limited edition of 11 platinum prints, was published in 2007.

Carolyn Cole

Working for the  Los Angeles Times s ince 1994, Carolyn Cole's photographs of many of the world's armed conflicts convey harsh realities far removed from the illusions of Hollywood.

Working for the Los Angeles Times since 1994, Carolyn Cole's photographs of many of the world's armed conflicts convey harsh realities far removed from the illusions of Hollywood. Cole (born 1961) won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography in 2004 for her coverage of the siege of Monrovia, the capital of Liberia. 

For nearly two decades, Cole has covered war, starvation, and brutality in the Middle East, Haiti, Kosovo, and Afghanistan. Like other conflict photographers, she has repeatedly placed herself in situations of danger to report on issues that she believes must be covered. In 2002 she earned her first nomination for the Pulitzer Prize for her coverage of a group of Palestinian gunmen who entered the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as they fled Israeli forces, setting off a standoff that lasted for 39 days. Cole joined a group of peace activists who entered the church in solidarity with the Palestinians and filed several stories from inside the conflict.

Cole has also been widely recognized for her sensitive portrayals of civilians, especially children caught in the destitution and horror surrounding armed conflicts. Her most recent project focuses on exploited children in various Asian countries.

John Baldessari

Throughout his prolific career, John Baldessari (born 1931) has approached his art through adamantly non-traditional paths. Since the late 1960s, Baldessari has combined snapshots that he takes himself or images from popular culture to make large scale works.

Throughout his prolific career, John Baldessari (born 1931) has approached his art through adamantly non-traditional paths. Since the late 1960s, Baldessari has combined  snapshots that he takes himself or images from popular culture to make large-scale works. Through surprising juxtapositions, image manipulation, and the use of directive titles or language in the work of art itself, Baldessari continually questions issues of perception and what may be acceptable as 'art.'

Baldessari's work can be broadly defined as belonging to an international "school" of conceptual artists whose works first came to prominence in the 1960s. In conceptual art, the idea that precedes the act of making the object is as important, or more important, than the object itself.  With humor and irony Baldessari conveys his constantly evolving ideas. In the mid-1980s, he blocked the faces with colored circles to make celebrities anonymous, rendering them mere "suits." In his most recent series, he uses fragments of facial close-ups and colors them selectively, reinventing their appearances in each successive piece.

His most recent retrospective monograph is John Baldessari: A Different Kind of Order, (Works 1962-1984), 2005 published by the Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien.

Tim Street-Porter

British born photographer Tim Street-Porter visited Los Angeles in the early 1970s and fell in love. Over the past three decades Street-Porter (born 1939) has photographed the city’s modernist architecture, often working with the same homes photographed by Julius Shulman.

British born photographer Tim Street-Porter visited Los Angeles in the early 1970s and fell in love. Over the past three decades Street-Porter (born 1939) has photographed the city's modernist architecture, often working with the same homes photographed by Julius Shulman. His fascination with the way people live began as a child when he stood before a building of flats bombed during the war. "It was like looking into a doll's house." 

The luscious quality of Los Angeles' natural light most attracted Street-Porter to Los Angeles. To this day, rather than using a digital camera, he photographs on film for its matchless superiority in capturing nuances of color and light. "The light here really is equivalent to the light in the Mediterranean and in North Africa that attracted Klee, Cezanne, Van Gogh and Matisse," he explains, calling it "a radiant quality." From the distinguished residential architecture of such master designers as Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Neutra, Rudolf Schindler, and Richard Meier to beaches, gaudy street signs, freeways, and vernacular buildings, Street-Porter describes his adopted home as "a vast residential theme park. . . a bewildering range of styles and fantasies, pretensions and idealistic visions." 

In his latest monograph, LA Modern, published in 2008, Street-Porter, an eloquent writer as well as renowned photographer, celebrates the birthplace of American modernism.

Julius Shulman

For over 72-years Julius Shulman (born 1910) has played a seminal role in architectural photography.

For over 72-years Julius Shulman (born 1910) has played a seminal role in architectural photography. Best known for his iconic photographs of landmark buildings in the international modern style such as the 1947 Kaufman House in Palm Springs and the 1960 "Case Study House #22" in the Hollywood Hills designed by C. H. "Buck" Stahl and Pierre Koenig, Shulman's images capture the futuristic energy of the Los Angeles and Southern California lifestyle, shaping its perception by the world. Now 98, he continues to photograph every day.

Shulman moved to Los Angeles in 1920 as a boy and watched its transformation after World War II from a relatively small town surrounded by farmland to a modern city of international stature. In 1936 his self-initiated photographs of a Richard Neutra house lead to Neutra commissioning Shulman to photograph subsequent buildings. He was soon hired by other visionary architects, such as Rudolph Schindler and Frank Lloyd Wright, who were active in Los Angeles from the 1930s through the 1950s. Shulman's images are characterized by an extraordinary sensitivity to the rhythmic interplay between interior living space and majestic vista that defines the Southern California international style, and to the human spirit that gives the California dream life.

In 2007, Taschen published his most recent monograph, Julius Shulman: Modernism Rediscovered, Shulman's tribute to forgotten masterpieces of California architecture.

Catherine Opie

Describing herself once as "a kind of twisted social documentary photographer," Catherine Opie (born 1961) probes questions of how identity is perceived and shaped

Describing herself once as "a kind of twisted social documentary photographer," Catherine Opie (born 1961) probes questions of how identity is perceived and shaped.  Opie first gained international renown in the 1990s for her intimate portraits of close friends in the Los Angeles lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and transvestite community, challenging perceptions of male and female identity. 

Opie then turned her lens to herself in a series of powerful self-portraits far removed from the self-flattery usually associated with self-reflection.  And she expanded her exploration of identity to include architecture and freeways, the distinctive visual elements that shape the individuality of various cities across the United States - gated homes and strip centers (Los Angeles), ice houses (Minneapolis), steel mills (Pittsburgh) - creating photographs of exquisite formal beauty in which a human presence is emphatically implied, though physically absent.

This exhibition presents selections from her recent series, In and Around Home, that raises questions of global identity through the microcosm of Opie's son and partner at home and of their neighbors in their multi-cultural Los Angeles neighborhood.

Her 2008 monograph, Catherine Opie: American Photographer, was published in conjunction with her Guggenheim Museum retrospective.

Genaro Molina

Genaro Molina was born in San Francisco in 1960. His career as a photojournalist included working for the San Francisco Chronicle, the  San Jose Mercury News, the  Claremont Courier and the  Sacramento Bee, before joining the staff of the  Los Angeles Times in 1995.

Genaro Molina was born in San Francisco in 1960. His career as a photojournalist included working for the San Francisco Chronicle, the San Jose Mercury News, the Claremont Courier and the Sacramento Bee, before joining the staff of the Los Angeles Times in 1995. He has won numerous awards, including the California Photographer of the year, the Clarion Award and the Harry Chapin Media Award. His ongoing goal is to continue working on stories of human interest that celebrate the diversity of Los Angeles, and the city in transition.