Coming This Fall: National Geographic


Top photo: Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea
Photo by Joel Sartore © 2008 National Geographic

National Geographic is experiencing a landmark birthday this year and we're helping them celebrate.

Coming to the Photography Space this October 26 is our exciting next exhibit: The Power of Photography: National Geographic 125 Years. Organized in collaboration with National Geographic magazine, the show celebrates the iconic publication’s 125 year anniversary. From iconic images to portraits; landscapes to natural history, the exhibit will offer a wide range of photographic genres and themes free to the public in a special print and digital exhibition that will include two documentaries. National Geographic magazine is the official journal of the National Geographic Society.

The curation and installation of The Power of Photography departs from previous Photography Space exhibit designs. Mosaics of more than 400 images documenting the history of National Geographic photography from 1888 to the present time will adorn the walls. In addition, an extensive digital installation will showcase 500-plus images. Thirty professional-grade large format LED monitors will be arranged to create video walls throughout the Photography Space galleries. These six video walls, ranging from 12 to 14 feet in width, will present both individual images and photographic essays. Given the volume of photographs on the screens, and a format in which the images loop at different times throughout the galleries, the viewing experience will be unique to each visitor and each visit.

The exhibit will feature an original documentary commissioned by the Annenberg Space for Photography and produced by Arclight Productions that profiles six renowned photographers whose work appears in the October National Geographic issue: Lynsey Addario, Marcus Bleasdale, David Guttenfelder, Abelardo Morell, Joel Sartore and Martin Schoeller. In addition, the Photography Space will also screen a short compilation video comprised of photographers talking about the power of photography and what inspires their work. This compilation will be complemented by a series of longer video interviews with 20 photographers represented in the exhibit and a loop of milestone content videos created over the past several years for the magazine’s digital edition.

The Power of Photography: National Geographic 125 Years opens October 26, 2013 and runs through April 27, 2014. 

Everything Is Beauty: Lecture With Fadil Berisha

What a treat it was to have fashion photographer Fadil Berisha present during our IRIS Nights lecture series yesterday evening.

Fadil has had a global influence throughout his career. He has not only worked with such figures as Tyra Banks, President Bill Clinton, Snoop Dogg and numerous Miss America contestants, but he also played an incredible role in campaigning against the Kosovo massacres.

During his presentation, Fadil explained that his work stems from a genuine love for beauty.

"Beauty is what I really love... I like to live happy and see pretty things all the time. With photographers it has to do with how they feel on the inside and that's what comes out on the photo," proclaimed Fadil during the lecture. "I love to feel happy."

Fadil took a moment during his lecture to speak about his experience photographing the horrific war in Kosovo. Since the topic wasn't related to beauty itself he placed his visual slideshow on pause because he felt it was important to take some time to talk about his experiences with the conflict.

About 10 years ago Albanian photographers contacted Fadil asking him to help promote their cause in the Kosovo war. He told the audience that the pictures they sent him changed his life. He then spent the next couple years raising money and campaigning for awareness. His work and the photos he took made an international impact and helped pressure the United States to get involved.

Fadil told the audience about his first time working with the stunning Carmen Dell'Orefice, the legend who was his inspiration for a Rolex campaign. He said he fell in love when he realized how she stayed young at heart and continued to exude beauty throughout her whole life.

Fadil also gave shout-outs to models Beverly Johnson and Nikki Haskell, who were both in attendance. He raved about how they each possessed that same confidence and beauty he found so alluring in Carmen.

Johnson took the microphone during the Q & A session but she didn't have a question for Fadil. Instead, she took the time to praise the photography by calling him "brilliant" and telling the audience she could not wait to work with him again.

Thanks for an outstanding lecture, Fadil! For more information about him, check out his official website. You can also watch his IRIS Nights lecture online.

(All lecture images by Unique)

Learn More About This Photo From WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY

Private First Class Wayne C. Weidner, assumed American, dates not known
Personnel of Battery B, 937th Field Artillery Battalion, US 8th Army, Attached to the IX US Corps, Fire Their Long Toms on Communist Targets in Support of Elements of the 25th US Infantry Division on the West Central Front, Near the Village of Nunema, Korea, 1951

This powerful photo from our upcoming War/Photography exhibit was taken by Private First Class Wayne Weidner during the Korean War. Want to know how the image was photographed? An excerpt from the accompanying 600-page exhibit catalogue, soon to be on sale the day the show opens on March 23, explains:

Another artillery photograph in this section was taken during the Korean War of personnel in Battery B, 937th Field Artillery Battalion, U.S. 8th Army, firing on Communist targets in support of the 25th U.S. Infantry Division near the village of Nunema, Korea (1951). The self-propelled guns seen in this photograph are artillery placed on a motorized chassis capable of rapid maneuver. “Fast-moving forces of armored infantry and tanks needed their artillery to keep pace with the advance,” wrote Jeffrey Hunt. “Weapons of this type could be brought into action very quickly and with devastating consequences for an enemy caught unprepared or above ground. And, as in this picture, the firing of heavy guns, whether on land or aboard ship, is a visually stunning spectacle.” Taken at night, the camera’s lens was held open until both guns had fired, illuminating the scene with explosions and the reflected light from the snow.

Click here to watch a preview of the exhibit.

For the Love of Helmut

By Tara Shannon

Working on location inspired Helmut Newton - and an inspired Helmut was a really playful Helmut.  This snap was taken during a really great shoot for French Vogue in the south of France where everything was flowing effortlessly and he was in a great mood. June was with him and their Hollywood friends were coming by to say hi.  Bob Rafelson brought Jessica Lang who had her newborn daughter with her.

We were in the garden having lunch and everyone was taking pictures of each other, laughing and stepping in on each other’s shots. I started shooting Helmut, pretending that I was him.

He yelled a lot when shooting, so I mimicked him: “Helmut! That’s it! Don’t Move!  Francois, POWDER! , Katia, HAIR! “  Everyone started joining in, telling him to arch his back or find his light. He was actually a really good model!  He liked being teased.  He just loved having fun. He wanted work to be fun. He wanted life to be fun.

I shot with a Pentax Auto 110 that I had bought in Japan. It was a complete ultra-miniature SLR system. fully automatic with no user-settable adjustments.

It was a perfect camera to travel with as a model. I could buy 110 film in any airport and every drugstore in the world could develop it in an hour. He was wild about it. June shot this pic of Helmut and I with that camera.  He called it The Dwarf appealing totally to how he worked- his equipment being as pared down as possible. He found amateur cameras more innovative than professional.  I think my Pentax appealed to him so much because Helmut really and truly  was a reportage photographer at heart. He was the Weegee of the fashion world- a visual shark. He was brilliant at capturing those lurking shadows so full of subtext and pathos that were blatantly hiding within the seemingly superficial.

His point of view was the rabbit hole. He left it up to the viewer to fall down it as deeply as they wanted to go.

Former model Tara Shannon was once referred to as "the woman of a thousand faces." Learn more about her on her official website.

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