Camille Seaman brings timeless wisdom to the Space

"...the Earth is not just our mother - we are made of this..." Camille Seaman said as she loaded up her first slide.

"None of us were born in space or on another planet - so everything that went into creating us came from this planet. And this planet is made from pieces of exploding stars...all of the metals that form the core of our planet - the metals that we mine and adorn our bodies with come from exploding stars."

"...we are made of stars..."

This was only the start of Camille Seaman's lecture at The Space yesterday, as she took us along on her personal journey (tagged onto the end of the story of creation!) to becoming a National Geographic  award-winning photographer.


Admitting that she was, by both nature and heredity, a bit of a storyteller, she proceed to tell us the story of her travels and growth as a photographer.

Camille played a slideshow of her current portfolio. Her soft-spoken voice only enhanced the boldness of her storytelling and photographic work documenting the fragile environment of the North and South Pole regions.

Her images are as courageous as they are beautiful.

Camille's life and work is inspirational and the peace, scale and calmness of her photography is thrilling.


After viewing her portfolio on the huge digital screen (a size perfectly suited for a subject so enormous), and following her unfolding of her perspective from having visited the vast openness of the planet's poles multiple times,


you couldn't help but to leave the presentation last night loving the earth just a little bit more than you did before.

At the end of the night she raffled off some prints to raise funds and awareness about her next (and last) visit to the Arctic, weaving the guests into her personal story of documenting the fragile extremes of our planet.


Thank you Camille for spreading the earth love!

(All photos © Unique for the Space)

Dennis Dimick comes full circle back to the Space


Dennis Dimick returned for a fourth visit to our Space - this time to gave a special inside-edition lecture about National Geographic 's current magazine issue, "Water" and other environmentally-focused previous issues.

Dimick was National Geographic  magazine's representative who first brought the concept of the special Water issue to our board last year as a potential exhibit and partnership between National Geographic  magazine and the Annenberg Space for Photography. He told us that his original presentation was based on a feature story from 1992 that he edited for the magazine about the coming freshwater crisis. Prescient!

He came for a second visit once the Water issue was coming together with actual images from around the world to show to us ... and of course he was here a third time for our opening in March. Now he returned to discuss National Geographic  magazine's leadership in combining photojournalism with environmental issues to study our planet's fragile state.

As the executive editor in the area of environmental issues, it is clear that Dennis' dedication to these issues has brought National Geographic  well-deserved praise.

Along with a catalogue of some amazing photographs, he brought a surprising tone of practicality to the endless debate of going green and going greener - or as Dennis puts it, moving from competition to collaboration and learning to do better with the resources you already have. His inspiration, he said, was rooted in his own upbringing on a farm...

...and his own personal journey shifted - as did the journeys of many of us attending - when he first encountered the famous image of the Earth from space on the cover of the Whole Earth Catalog.

Covering some dense perspectives of our current environmental challenges, i.e., responsible disposal of electronic waste or recyclables, Dennis began the lecture with some personal inspirations that have led to his part in the creation of National Geographic 's stories.

Our growing population,

and the attendant rise in CO2 output,

the frightening reminders of our shrinking glaciers,

and the resulting climate changes that have brought about new flooding,

as well as new droughts,

and draining reservoirs.

It wasn't what I would call a feel-good lecture but it was amazingly clear, level-headed and informative. This is a testament to the clarity with which Dennis approaches the global view of our climate changes and water crises.

Dennis was cool enough to hang out after the lecture to answer questions and view photographic work of lecturer goers, including some large prints in 3D by photographer Stuart Sperling.

Thank you for coming back Dennis...

...your presence is always welcome here!

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