The "Digital Darkroom" Opening - In 3D!

Here's another reason to hang on to the free 3D glasses provided to you when you visit the Space. During last month's opening gala for "Digital Darkroom," Ted Grudowski, whose impressive 3D images are featured in the exhibit, walked around the party with his own 3D camera, snapping images of the artists and partygoers. Ted has kindly provided us those photos and here they are below. Put on those 3D glasses and enjoy!

Pre-opening gala, Ted's fellow "Digital Darkroom" 3D photographer Christopher Schneberger in front of the Photography Space.

The man behind the camera - Ted Grudowski himself!

The legendary Jerry Uelsmann striking a 3D pose.

Maggie Taylor in front of her outstanding digitally manipulated work.

Annenberg Foundation Executive Director addresses the crowd gathered to celebrate the show's opening.

The excited aforementioned crowd!

3D artist Mike Pucher, right, and his proud parents.

Exhibited photographer Martine Roch, who wants to make all of us smile, gives her best 3D pose.

Guests at the gala alongside some Annenberg Foundation folks.

Pierre Beteille strikes a pose toward the end of the night.

Thanks for the images Ted! Be sure to check out other (2D!) photos from the gala we posted shortly after the opening.

(all images by Ted Grudowski)

Blog Tags: 

Total Immersion

by Christopher Schneberger

I've always been a storyteller as much as a photographer. A little over ten years ago I began making narrative images dealing with spirits that revisited the spaces, and sometimes the people, that were important to them in life.  My spirits were not really the scary ghosts of horror movies or campfire lore, but ethereal interlopers that would visit lonely souls among the living.   A lost daughter would appear to her still living mother, a husband might return to his widow, or a vaporous ballerina would dance for a lonesome janitor in her former studio.

I would often include specific names and dates (birth & death) for these spirits.  Viewers and collectors find these specifics curious and ask me if there was some historical, factual basis for the imagery.  At a certain point I decided I would create a much more ambitious project - somewhat of a whodunit mystery in the form of an installation.  The project revolved around a pair of twins from the early 20th century, one of whom had mysteriously died but returned in spirit form to cavort with her sister.  I wrote an elaborate backstory for this involving their family and a scientist cum photographer, Dr. Charles Addison.  The exhibition took the form of an installation - the "recreation" of Dr. Addison's studio where (as I posit) Addison photographed Regina Crosswell and her ghostly twin, Lydia.  The room had period wallpaper, curtains and the same furniture pieces seen in the photographs.  I treated the installation as a museum exhibit, replete with curatorial text recounting the story.  Not much gave any indication that it was a fictitious artistic work.  To my great surprise, and joy, many people took it as fact and wondered how I had discovered this story.

Since that time, my work has continued to explore the supernatural in ordinary life, and particularly in America in the early 20th Century.  The next story was about Frances Naylor, a legless girl who briefly developed, at the age of 13, the ability to levitate.  She floated about her home in Evanston, Illinois, and was photographed by her father, an amateur photographer.  Her mother saw the ability as a sinister manifestation and forbade her from levitating in public.  The first exhibition of the work took place in the house where the images were made.  The public could, at once, see the photographs and the exact spot where they had occurred.  As in the previous installation, this created an immersive environment that brought the audience into the story.  Again the accompanying text treated the story as fact and allowed the audience to suspend disbelief.  This further immersed them in the story.

The following tale came about through historical research.  My gallery in Chicago, Printworks, is housed in a rehabbed warehouse building that was once home to the National Candy Company.  National was even owned by Vincent Price Sr., father of the well-known actor (no kidding!).  So, I decided to tell the story of something that could have happened at the factory.  In this case, the story was that of Anna Sula, a young orphan worker who was found murdered at the factory.  Photographs later surfaced showing that Anna had telekinetic powers and participated in meetings of a private circle at the factory.  Could this have something to do with her brutal murder?  I leave it for the viewer to decide.

In addition to the elaborate story and the installation, I also immerse the viewer in the imagery by using stereo photography (3D).  My work is primarily exhibited in 2D form, but I have the ability to display it in 3D as well.  Sometimes this is in the form of View-Master reels and viewers, sometimes as antique-style stereo cards, and sometimes as anaglyph prints that require the paper red/cyan glasses.  This is the form they are currently in at "Digital Darkroom" at the Annenberg Space for Photography.

All of my major narrative works can be enjoyed at the Annenberg Space as narrated 3D slide shows.  There is a monitor booth near my framed work with displays for shows, complete with music and narration.

I am currently at work on a new series which is in color and set contemporarily.  It involves a family (husband, wife, son, daughter) who live in an older house that has a ghost who looks in on their lives.  This show will debut at Printworks in October of this year.  And I hope to show a few preview images at my IRIS Nights lecture at Annenberg on Thursday, February 16th.

Christopher Schneberger is a traditionalist and an iconoclast. He has created photographic series of both infrared and mural-sized photographs. His work often weaves a narrative tale incorporating supernatural elements. See his work in "Digital Darkroom" which runs from December 17, 2011 - May 28, 2012.

Claudia Kunin On Her Debut At The Photography Space

by Claudia Kunin

I first visited the Annenberg Space for Photography during it's grand nighttime gala opening in March, 2009 and was truly wowed by its dedication to the exhibition of digital photography. Here was this eye-shaped gallery with gigantic digital displays in a darkened atmosphere. It was the first time I had ever seen a space like it. In fact, I don't think there is another like it in the world! For me, a dream was set in motion that night: I wanted to show my work in the Photography Space.

I didn't know how I would go about doing it.....as it seems that promoting one's own work is often times fruitless. It was in April of 2010 that I met Pat Lanza, the passionate genius, behind-the-scenes curator at the Annenberg Space for Photography, and she told me that my work would be perfect for an upcoming show she was putting together called "Digital Darkroom." Huzzah!

Now here I am, part of a fabulous group of 17 talented artists lighting up the walls at the Photography Space. Because I knew I was going to be part of the show, it inspired me to push myself further, beyond the technological boundaries I had previously been working in. I put my nose to the grindstone, learning how to animate my pieces so they could be projected at the Photography Space. I'm proud to say that my work will indeed be shown in that mysterious eye-shaped room - 3D animations and all. I am so very excited to have a long term goal come to fruition. Just another example of how the impossible can be made possible!

Claudia Kunin worked for years as a commercial photographer before experiencing a transformational moment and devoting her life to fine art photography. Her 3D photography is dedicated to exploring the past, making connections and expressing the inexpressible. See her work in "Digital Darkroom" which runs from December 17, 2011 - May 28, 2012.

Ted Grudowski: "Go Into a World that Doesn't Exist Anywhere Else"

By now many of you have seen Ted Grudowski's incredible 3D photography in "Digital Darkroom." His exhibited work includes images that feature Bruce Springstreen and U2's The Edge. Watch this short video (it's less than 2 minutes) and learn more about how Grudowski goes about creating his photographs. Also, don't forget that you can look through all of the 3D images in the print show here.

Put On Your 3D Glasses...

...Because here is a great in your face group photo of 16 of the 17 artists featured in "Digital Darkroom" (also including Russell Brown and the Space's Pat Lanza) - in 3D! The photo was taken by Ted Grudowski's own 3D camera. We'll have more 3D content on this site very soon so hang on to those 3D glasses you get when you come visit the Space in person!

Click the photo above for a larger image.

Blog Tags: