• /the-shot-blog/elizabeth-kreutz-cycles-iris-nights

    Elizabeth Kreutz is the quintessential modern day sports photographer and she conveyed just that image during her IRIS Nights talk last night.

    She does it all - photographing the Tour de France while five months pregnant, covering not one, but two Olympics and working a full year as the exclusive documentary photographer of Lance Armstrong during his comeback in 2009.

    The twittering photojournalist makes sure she shares as many of her adventures on Twitter as she can. Elizabeth, with a little help, even managed to tweet a picture of herself during her IRIS Nights lecture.

    Elizabeth's remarkable work with Armstrong has garnered her three awards -- World Press Photo for Sports Feature Story (first place), POYi for Sports Picture Story (first place) and the Photo District News Photo Annual.

    Elizabeth's Twitter fans may have been disappointed she didn't share any pics of her baby boy Charlie during her presentation at the Space, but everyone left inspired by the amazing photographs that revealed sports celeb Armstrong's more private moments.

    Elizabeth's presentation, which included the infamous drug-testing photo of the cyclist, covered everything you would want to know about Armstrong, including his quirks, passion as well as his dedication to the Lance Armstrong Foundation.

    Thanks, Elizabeth, for a great night and we'll see you on Twitter!

    (All images © Unique for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/ami-vitale-story-within-story

    Acclaimed photographer Ami Vitale joined us at the Space on Thursday and shared her award winning work shot in Kashmir along with other recent still and video projects. Vitale's photographs have appeared in Time, Newsweek, US News & World Report and The New York Times, among others.

    We didn't know what to expect but got very positive words from the one-and-only David Hume Kennerly who called the day of the lecture to express his regrets for not being able to attend.

    She was - as Kennerly forewarned us - extremely charming and quite a wonderful photographer. The theme of her talk was "The Story Within The Story" and she told many...

    Touching stories, beautiful stories, tragic stories - moments of memory made timeless by the arresting images she took as they unfolded.

    The images were poignant portraits of cultures and identities around the globe, and the stories she shared about them were just as engaging- we wished she published her written journal.

    Her presentation displayed the strong bond that she shares with her subjects and the communities she works in.

    A bond which - it was clear - she had no trouble making with those who came to hear her speak as well.

    Ami withheld no details regarding her choice of photo gear, her process - or her decision not to use Photoshop.

    She also made it clear through retelling some personal experiences, that she thinks every photographer should fight to keep their copyright.

    A transporting evening courtesy of an amazing talent...and so friendly and approachable too!

    Thank you Ami!

    (All images © Unique for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/stanley-greene-stamps-his-black-passport-space

    Stanley Greene represents a dwindling number of photographers honored for their work with traditional film photography. Yet unlike many legendary film photographers who refuse to convert to digital, Stanley has not only learned to appreciate the winning aspects of digital photography but is currently celebrating a positive response to a YouTube trailer to promote his new photo book: Black Passport.

    Black Passport is a stark collection of Greene's images made only more powerful by their collection into this striking trailer. When Stanley showed this clip at the Space on the giant 7' x 14' screens - the reaction was powerful and palpable.

    We were blown away.

    Stanley is not exactly a huge fan of digital film and its online video complement (which he called 'the youTUBE") - it was clear throughout his presentation that he will always prefer traditional film photography.

    He name-checked Kathryn Bigelow and sang her praises for using traditional film to shoot "Hurt Locker," and also added that - to his client's dismay - his next year-long project is set to be shot solely on film.

    In his presentation, Stanley acknowledged the challenges facing photographers who prefer film in a digital society, but made it clear that he welcomed the fight to preserve and continue the use of film.

    The lecture was much more than just a "film vs. digital" debate. Stanley shared images and discussed the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the recent earthquake in Haiti.

    His images were bold and evocative.

    Stanley brought a casual air of cool to the podium - giving his presentation like he was having a conversation with friends. He had a fluid quality to his speech and gestures that brought to mind a musician soloing at the front of a darkened stage.

    The Q&A was as interesting as the presentation.

    Afterwards, Stanley held court and autographed copies of "Black Passport."

    He even made that into something special to witness...

    Thank you Mr. Greene for giving us so much to think and 'travel' on!

    BTW - the same day as Mr. Greene graced our Space he was lauded and loved on the pages of the NY Times Lens Blog in an entry titled "Stanley Greene's Redemption and Revenge." Go and read more about him!

  • /the-shot-blog/kate-orne-may-you-never-be-uncovered


    Kate Orne - our 48th IRIS Nights lecturer - came to the Space to share her research on victims of the Pakistan sex trade. For over four years Kate has been documenting this dark demimonde and its oppressed population.

    Kate's collection of images represents a fragile and honest portrayal of the women and girls living in Pakistan's brothels. Her work is the result of developing long term friendships, trust relationships and complete, non-judgmental acceptance between her and her subjects.

    Kate's presentation was frank, direct and - surprisingly - humorous! A highlight from the Q&A was Orne saying, in reply to how Pakistani men resolve being Muslim and going to prostitutes: "there is something stronger than religion, and that is SEX! Everyone wants to get laid!"

    But going beyond the humor, Kate expressed a powerful personal passion and eagerness to resolve a history of abuse where women are forced into sex trade - and yet she also demonstrated a gentle and compassionate tone discussing these victims who continue to work the sex trade without force.

    Kate encourages those interested in learning more to visit her website. To protect the identity of the subjects photographed, the images shown during the presentation will not be posted online.

    (All images © Unique for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/brian-l-frank-and-our-rivers

    Wearing his signature baseball cap, Brian L. Frank, POYi award winning photographer whose work is prominently featured in this exhibition's digital video, gave an awesome lecture at the Space on Thursday.

    Brian covered his current portfolio as well as images of the Colorado River that brought him international success as POYi's Global Visionary Award recipient. Brian spoke at length about his inspirations, including the WPA photographs of the country during the depression.

    Brian's tip for success was as simple and clear as his personal presentation... respect the story and respect the voice of the subject regardless of how unpopular the point of view is.

    Understanding the perspective of the subject is critical to the success of the image and the impact it has.

    Brian shared some of his current multimedia projects as well as his thoughts on the industry's use of audio still projects and how it can be improved.

    Witty and all too charming, Brian's ability to establish genuine relationships with his subjects was evident in his ease of establishing a relationship with those of use who gathered to hear him speak and see his images. His down-to-earth connection with his subjects and the environment he captures has produced some of the most remarkable images of Mexico City and its people we've ever seen.

    He even demonstrated his ability to establish ease with his subject on a few of our attending guests!

    Thank you Brian L. Frank...you are a humble inspiration.

    (PS On July 23 Brian appeared on NPR's discussing his photo essay "Death of the Colorado" - very cool!)

    (All Photos © 2010 Unique for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/gil-garcetti-our-45th-iris-night-lecture

    It was the 45th IRIS Nights Lecture and the very last lecture during our "Water" exhibition. Annenberg Foundation Executive Director Leonard Aube and Director of Operations Sylia Obagi were there to welcome our lecturer, the former elected district attorney of Los Angeles, Gil Garcetti.

    Garcetti wasn't making another routine stop made by politicians every election year, that is, he isn't running for office. In fact, the purpose for his visit was to deliver one of many portfolio presentations by Gil Garcetti, the critically acclaimed (by the New York Times!) photographer.

    Although he's given up his role prosecuting criminals, Garcetti has taken up a new advocacy defending our world most crucial resource, water.

    Just prior to the lecture, Aube took an informal poll of the crowd to see how many people were regulars - and he found a large number of hands in the air when he asked how many people had been to more than 10 of our lectures!

    ...and there was one gentleman who had attended 43 of the 45 lectures!
    Now that's dedication.

    Garcetti has documented water and the empowerment of women in West Africa, hoping to bring global attention to issues of safe water and economic stabilization.

    He helped inspire the creation of Wells Bring Hope - a nonprofit org that helps dig wells for underserved communities in Africa.

    Who would have ever believed that after years as a high profile D.A., Garcetti would transition into a career as a highly regarded photographer?

    Garcetti told of how his first published images of the Walt Disney Music Hall earned him praise from photographic greats (and previous exhibitor/lecturers) like Julius Schulman and David Hume Kennerly.

    Early work showed the steel workers on the project

    - and he described how his chosen form of expression became his passion and his post-political career.

    Eager to start a new trend here in America, Garcetti also shared some stories from his current work Women in Bikes,

    a collection of images of fashionable women who bicycle in Paris as an everyday means of transportation.

    His presentation at the Space secured a whole new audience of followers.

    At the book signing following the lecture, Garcetti helped raised over $1,275 from book sales to go to Wells Bring Hope.

    and received a donation of over $6,000 from a foundation in attendance!

    What a great way to close an incredible exhibit...and what a nice surprise for our final lecturer for Water: Our Thirsty World!

    Thank you Mr. Garcetti for helping us demonstrate the many ways in which philanthropy can take shape!

    (All images © Unique for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/ian-shive-offers-water-sky-space

    We were sad to hear that our June 3rd lecturer, Christian Cravo, had to cancel due to schedule conflicts. Fortunately the very pleasant Ian Shive agreed to step into the fray and lecture instead.

    There's much to know about Ian Shive. Perhaps his passing resemblance to Christian Slater - whom he probably encountered during his former years working in publicity at Columbia Pictures - is not on the top ten list, but there are a number of other influential factors from his personal life that have shaped his perspective and allowed his work to stand apart from the masses of landscape photography.

    On Thursday night, Ian shared his work at the Space and how and why he creates the images that leave our jaws wagging.

    From Coachella Valley to Croatia, Ian Shive has travelled the world as a conservation photographer, achieving countless awards and national recognition along the way.

    His current body of work examines how our world interacts with the planet's most valuable but increasingly threatened resource water.

    Ian shared his most memorable accounts documenting ceremonial gatherings of water around the Ganges River to everyday communal get-togethers in Krka River in Croatia.

    Ian has only been a professional full-time photographer for the last three years, but has been shooting since childhood.

    His award-winning book The National Parks: Our American Landscape was released in 2009 and he shared numerous images from it.

    It's clear that even without the accolades Ian would still be out in the field capturing these fantastic images and serving as an advocate for our environment.

    His work is truly from the heart and you can see it in every image.

    After the lecture, Ian answered a few questions from the enthusiastic crowd.

    ...and even though he didn't bring copies of his book to sign, some fans brought copies of their own...

    A gentleman and a scholar, that Ian Shive...and so polite too.

    Thank you Ian!

    (All images © Unique for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/national-geographics-griffin-packs-space

    Over the course of the current exhibition's IRIS Nights lecture series, we've had an incredible opportunity to get to know and love the staff of one of our favorite magazines - National Geographic .

    The behind-the-scenes stories of how NatGeo  photographers capture those unparalleled moments of our changing world almost rivals the wonder of viewing the photographs published in the magazine.

    So it comes as no surprise that our final executive guest lecturer from National Geographic , Director of Photography David Griffin...

    ...was greeted by a VERY full house last Thursday at the Space.

    David delivered that sought-after narrative, bringing us inside National Geographic  and answered questions from the audience including the ultimate...how to become a National Geographic  photographer?

    Wallis Annenberg, Neil Leifer,

    Lauren Greenfield,

    and Michael Robinson Chávez

    were all in attendance at the Space for David's lecture and multimedia presentation.

    Along with the first-hand stories from the front lines,

    David brought video footage and behind-the-scenes stills of NatGeo  photographers chasing the moments,

    capturing the extraordinary,

    and covering over 100 years of published issues.

    The lecture was at times funny,

    at times frightening,

    at times instructive,

    and all in all, totally awe-inspiring.

    Thank you David Griffin!

    (All images © Unique for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/maisel-makes-your-mind-spin-black-maps

    Not many of our guest lecturers visit the Space to present a collection of images focusing on environmentally-polluted sites and then disassociate their work from the larger effort of global advocacy...especially in regards to our world's water crisis.

    But in the case of New York-born Princeton and Harvard grad David Maisel, when it comes to his photography, his work neither represents answers to a conflict nor offers any resolution other than a sense of poetic truth.

    ...if this is your position David, then thou ART as wise as thou ART beautiful!

    Maisel's aerial photographs of sites where the natural ecological order has been eradicated are images of a stunning atrocity.

    At first glance, you see a brilliant photograph of splattered colors,

    but upon further examination, the photo actually depicts a man-made sea of toxic minerals destroying our environment.

    A bittersweet presentation, Maisel's work - titled Black Maps  - is a visually emotional creation that does more than just leave an impression...

    ...it speaks to the soul.

    If you missed the lecture, this is unfortunately one time when you won't be able to watch it online.

    However, we will be posting an audio file and a transcript,

    as well as a gallery of more photos.

    But you must see the work...

    ...it's truly unique.

    Afterward, David was extremely genial and approachable.

    He answered questions, chatted with guests...

    ...signed some copies of his book Oblivion ...

    then bid us all goodbye and good night.

    (All photos © Unique for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/dennis-dimick-comes-full-circle-back-space


    Dennis Dimick returned for a fourth visit to our Space - this time to gave a special inside-edition lecture about National Geographic 's current magazine issue, "Water" and other environmentally-focused previous issues.

    Dimick was National Geographic  magazine's representative who first brought the concept of the special Water issue to our board last year as a potential exhibit and partnership between National Geographic  magazine and the Annenberg Space for Photography. He told us that his original presentation was based on a feature story from 1992 that he edited for the magazine about the coming freshwater crisis. Prescient!

    He came for a second visit once the Water issue was coming together with actual images from around the world to show to us ... and of course he was here a third time for our opening in March. Now he returned to discuss National Geographic  magazine's leadership in combining photojournalism with environmental issues to study our planet's fragile state.

    As the executive editor in the area of environmental issues, it is clear that Dennis' dedication to these issues has brought National Geographic  well-deserved praise.

    Along with a catalogue of some amazing photographs, he brought a surprising tone of practicality to the endless debate of going green and going greener - or as Dennis puts it, moving from competition to collaboration and learning to do better with the resources you already have. His inspiration, he said, was rooted in his own upbringing on a farm...

    ...and his own personal journey shifted - as did the journeys of many of us attending - when he first encountered the famous image of the Earth from space on the cover of the Whole Earth Catalog.

    Covering some dense perspectives of our current environmental challenges, i.e., responsible disposal of electronic waste or recyclables, Dennis began the lecture with some personal inspirations that have led to his part in the creation of National Geographic 's stories.

    Our growing population,

    and the attendant rise in CO2 output,

    the frightening reminders of our shrinking glaciers,

    and the resulting climate changes that have brought about new flooding,

    as well as new droughts,

    and draining reservoirs.

    It wasn't what I would call a feel-good lecture but it was amazingly clear, level-headed and informative. This is a testament to the clarity with which Dennis approaches the global view of our climate changes and water crises.

    Dennis was cool enough to hang out after the lecture to answer questions and view photographic work of lecturer goers, including some large prints in 3D by photographer Stuart Sperling.

    Thank you for coming back Dennis...

    ...your presence is always welcome here!

Pages

Copyright © 2014. The Annenberg Space for Photography. All rights reserved.
Privacy & Accessibility Statement
Sitemap