• /the-shot-blog/final-countdown-starts-today

    With The Doors song "The End" playing in our heads, we're sad to announce that this coming weekend is your last chance to see Who Shot Rock & Roll as the show will come to a close this Sunday, October 21.

    But you're in luck as The Final Countdown begins today! What this means is that we will offer extended evening hours so to accomodate as many of you as we can during the last few days of the shot.

    As a reminder, The Final Countdown hours will be:

    Thursday, October 18, 10am - 10pm (please note that part of the exhibit will be closed from 5pm-8pm for a lecture)
    Friday, October 19, 10am - Midnight
    Saturday, October 20, 10am - Midnight
    Sunday, October 21, 11am - 6pm

    Yes, you saw that right - we're open until midnight on Friday & Saturday!

    In conjunction with The Final Countdown, several cafes in Century Park (that's name of the park in Century City in which we're located) will be extending their hours:

    Cuvée: Open until 10pm on Thursday & Friday; 11:30am - 7pm on Saturday
    Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf: Open until 8pm on Thursday & Friday

    Also, during the extended evening hours on Thursday, Friday & Saturday, enter to win special prize drawings.

    Don't wait because come Sunday at 6pm, our doors will close until November 17 so we can prepare for our next exhibit, no strangers.

  • /the-shot-blog/who-shot-rock-roll-street-banner-your-living-room

    Or your dining room. Or where ever you want really because one of those street banners can be yours to own and do with however you want!

    For a limited time, we are offering all four variations of the vinyl banners for sale. You can choose from Florence Welch of Florence & the Machine, Kurt Cobain or Tina Turner. Our John Lennon banners are already completely sold out. Don't worry - even though they've been hanging out in the clean LA air over the last few months, they'll be professionally cleaned when you receive them.

    Click here for more information on how to get one.

  • /the-shot-blog/albert-watson-shot-rock-photographer-his-photo-michael-jackson
     © Albert Watson

    By Albert Watson

    This was the first and only time I worked with Michael Jackson. We were booked for a two-day shoot for the Invincible album cover and some inside photos. The shooting was divided into one day of portraits and one day of dance shots at my studio in New York.

    I already owned a mirror rig that allowed me to adjust eight mirrors individually. And, of course, before Michael arrived, the mirrors and lighting were completely prepared on the set. To give Michael more flexibility (and to add a little fun) I gave him what was essentially a stripper's pole on a white Plexi stage. When he arrived on the set, Michael spent two or three minutes stretching and then started dancing in front of the mirrors to "Billie Jean," which we played over the studio stereo system. Because of the set-up and the preparation, it was hard not to get some magical shots in almost every frame during the roughly 30 minutes he danced in front of the camera. This was Michael Jackson dancing, after all. How could you go wrong?

    I found Michael charming, cooperative, totally professional, and a pleasure to deal with. The shooting was actually quite easy. After seeing the contact sheets from the shoot, the final print was essentially one gigantic contact sheet. From far away, the print looks almost like a piece of wallpaper, but close up, it gives you a very good idea of the entire shooting, and the charisma and power of Michael's dancing."

    See more of Albert's images in Who Shot Rock & Roll, showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography through October 21, 2012. Learn more about him on his website at www.albertwatson.net.

  • /the-shot-blog/ian-dickson-shot-rock-photographer-his-photo-red-hot-chili-peppers
    © Ian Dickson

    By Ian Dickson

    This shot of the Red Hot Chili Peppers was taken in Hamburg, Germany in 1992. I photographed the band while on an assignment for Vox magazine, a monthly music publication in competition with Q Magazine and now sadly defunct.

    Henry Rollins, who was the support act that night, claimed his band blew the Chili Peppers off stage.

    The band’s energy is infectious and you get caught up in the rhythm while taking pictures – such great fun. Each time you have to stop to load a new film, it feels like a rude interruption.

    See more of Ian's images in Who Shot Rock & Roll, showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography through October 21, 2012. Learn more about him on his website at www.late20thcenturyboy.com.

  • /the-shot-blog/godlis-shot-rock-photographer-his-photo-patti-smith

    By Godlis

    I remember that night like it was yesterday. They say a camera stops time, and for me, in this case it’s proven to be true. One-quarter of a second exposure on my handheld Leica IIIf camera back in 1976 has endured via silver and megapixels all these years.

    I spent a lot of time in 1976 looking through the French photographer Brassai’s photographs of Paris nightlife in the 1930s, and had worked out a way to shoot photographs at night by natural light without flash. In looking back now, it was all of another time – pushed tri-x film, arcane developing chemicals, nights in the darkroom. But it enabled me to return night after night to CBGB’s with boxes of pictures to show off my experiments to my friends in a budding scene and create my “Documents for Artists.”

    It was in between sets when everyone headed out from within CBGB’s, to the raw air under the Bowery streetlights.  Patti Smith was standing in mid-conversation that night, when I tapped her on the shoulder and asked if I could take her photograph. I know I saw the Bleecker Street sign in the background and thought “perfect.” I knew that she was standing in the right spot, under the streetlamps. All the elements were in place. So when she turned my way and brought her hand to her face – I knew in that moment, the photo was mine to have or screw up.  Shooting at night, handheld – no tripod - meant both Patti and I would have to be perfectly still. I did my part that night, and obviously Patti more than did hers. One-quarter of a second stopped forever. Time on my side.

    See Godlis's work in the Who Shot Rock & Roll exhibit, currently showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography. To learn more about the photographer and his work visit his official website.

  • /the-shot-blog/laura-levine-shot-rock-photographer-her-photo-rem
    R.E.M, Walter's Bar-B-Que, Athens, Georgia, 1984

    By Laura Levine

    R.E.M. and I clicked from the moment we met at our first photo shoot in my Chinatown apartment back in 1982. We became close friends, and over the next few years as we spent an increasing amount of time together, I photographed them more than any other band before or since: on the road, at their homes, in my studio, backstage and onstage.

    This particular photograph was taken in March 1984 in their hometown, of Athens, Georgia. The band was about to release its second album, Reckoning, and since their record label didn't have a budget to send a photographer to Athens to do a publicity session, I flew down on my own dime to shoot pictures, make a Super-8 film (Just Like a Movie) and spend a few days hanging out with my friends.

    For the next few days I shot rolls and rolls of film as the five of us explored every nook and cranny in Athens that had photogenic possibilities - the railroad tracks, abandoned factories, trees blanketed in kudzu, outsider artist R.A. Miller's whirlygig yard and, of course, Walter's Bar-B-Que.  Actually, this shot at Walter's wasn't even planned. We'd been taking photos all morning and we'd worked up quite an appetite, so we stopped into Walter's for lunch (It was the guys' favorite BBQ joint).  While we were eating I looked around and saw a great photograph there, so I stepped behind the counter and quickly took a few frames (I'm afraid I didn't even allow them to eat their meals in peace).  By the way, that's my plate of food in front of Michael Stipe.

    This photograph has a special place in my heart not only because of our friendship, but because it documents a time and a place that disappeared soon thereafter. (Even Walter's is long out of business). I don't suppose any us of could have imagined how much would change in just a few years' time. It captures those last moments of innocence, just as they were on the cusp of stardom and about to embark on an adventure of a lifetime.  But mostly, for me, when I look at this photograph, I see my four friends being themselves, smiling, relaxing, and chowing down on a good Southern meal.

    See Laura Levine's other images in the Who Shot Rock & Roll exhibit, currently showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography. To learn more about the photographer and her work visit her official website.

  • /the-shot-blog/watch-clip-who-shot-rock-roll-film

    Who Shot Rock & Roll: The Film accompanies the photo exhibit of the same name. The short documentary focuses on the work of the show's nine featured photographers with original interviews and hundreds more rock & roll images. One of the interviewees, Mary McCartney, discusses her mother Linda's body of work. Watch a 3-minute clip of Mary talking about her mother's photos of Paul McCartney, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and many others above. A young Mary even makes an appearance in one of the photos she discusses.

  • /the-shot-blog/portugal-man-who-shot-rock-roll-live

    Who Shot Rock & Roll: Live continued over the weekend with the second of three concerts we are presenting with KCRW - and what a show it was! The night served to bring people together to celebrate music and photography  as well as commemorate the 40th anniversary of T. Rex's influential album The Slider - all for free! Portugal. The Man put on an amazing show - one that people were still talking about days afterward.

    Droves of people filled the park outside of the Annenberg Space for Photography.

    Everyone was in good spirits at this all ages show. Some adults even let out their more youthful and care-free side.

    There was a line to enter to see the Who Shot Rock & Roll photography exhibit all day long.

    One of the exhibit's featured photographers, Ed Colver, who also attended the Moby concert earlier this month, showed up with his lovely wife Karin.

    Before the show, the members of Portugal. The Man came up to the Annenberg Foundation to play for a live televised news segment.

    KCRW DJs Dan Wilcox & Gary Calamar began the entertainment part of the night by spinning some records.

    The crowd had a good time listening to music...

    ...and dancing!

    A concertgoer proudly shows off his newly purchased Who Shot Rock & Roll t-shirt!

    Portugal. The Man came on stage shortly after 8 o'clock playing their own songs as well as covers of T. Rex tunes.

    The band has even compiled their own YouTube video playlist inspired by the exhibit.

    The crowd - really energized by the music!

    The band ended their fantastic hour and a half-long set with a lively rendition of the Beatles' "Hey Jude."

    Thanks to everyone who came out to this magical night to enjoy rock & roll images and rock & roll music. Our third (and final!) show in the free concert series with Band of Skulls & Raphael Saadiq will be Saturday, August 4. Find more information about that night here.

    (All images by Unique Nicole for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/lauren-greenfield-comes-full-circle-beauty-culture

    While BEAUTY CULTURE continues to break attendance records here at the Annenberg Space for Photography, we thought now would be a good time as any to publish a post on one of featured photographers, Lauren Greenfield and the documentary film, also titled BEAUTY CULTURE, that accompanies the show. The 30-minute film was directed by the award-winning photographer herself.

    Produced by her husband and producing partner, Frank Evers, Greenfield filmed the documentary over the course of several months in Los Angeles, New York and Paris. Her intent was to create a film that focused on the sociological and psychological perceptions of beauty from a cross-cultural viewpoint.

    Regarding her work on BEAUTY CULTURE Greenfield says, "A lot of the things I photograph are interconnected: from the young girls and the kind of precocious sexualization of young girls, to the vanity of teenagers and the kind of struggle to establish your identity as a teenager, to women and older women facing the challenge of getting older in a youth-obsessed culture. So this project, BEAUTY CULTURE, allowed me to kind of bring the work full circle and look at all aspects."

    The film has been met with resounding praise from many guests here at the photography space citing Los Angeles--with its Hollywood machine and incessant promotion of the billion-dollar cosmetics industry--as an ideal location for a film addressing warped ideals of beauty.

    BEAUTY CULTURE is certainly not Greenfield's first foray into filmmaking. Her documentary Thin premiered on HBO in 2006, also screening at the Sundance Film Festival. A film dealing with eating disorders of young women, Thin went on to earn Greenfield an Emmy nomination for Best Director of Non-Fiction Programming. Her follow-up doc kids + money, also broadcast on HBO, won the Audience Award for Best Short Film at the AFI Film Festival among other honors.

    The film, which features interviews with Jamie Lee Curtis, Tyen, Crystal Renn and many others, screens throughout the day at the Space. Make sure you come see it before the exhibit closes next month.

    As for Greenfield, she will return to the Space as our IRIS Nights lecturer on Thursday, October 13, in what is sure to be a standing-room only event!

  • /the-shot-blog/photo-link-round-0

    Check out what is happening in the photography world this week!

    1. In honor of Kodak's ten year anniversary of its first digital zoom camera,

    DC Views has compared elements of photography from when it was a 'digital science' to the 'easy sharing' aspect of today.

    2. In a timely web 'service' offering Military personnel are remembering their time in service with photo books offered specially by the Military Yearbook Printing Company....but sometimes uploading pictures to a website can be extremely complicated.

    3. Hollywood photographer David Strick is suing the Los Angeles Times for illegally publishing 174 of his photos.

    The law suit could potentially cost $150,000 for each infringement, and there are 510 alleged violations!

    4. When David Strick seemed to deliver too many photos, wedding photographer Gerald Randolph Byrd didn't deliver enough.

    In fact Byrd refused to hand over the photos and is now serving two years of house arrest for fraudulent intent. The original sentence was eight years in prison.

    5. But on a lighter note National Geographic has announced the "Best Travel Pictures of 2011" and they are incredible.
    Photograph by Robin Moore

    Click here to check them out.

    Photograph by Becky Kagan Schott

    We hope you have fun surfing the web for more photography updates!

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