• /the-shot-blog/david-corio-shot-rock-roll-photographer-his-image-salt-n-pepa
    Salt-N-Pepa, Radio City Music Hall, New York City, 1994

    By David Corio

    The policy for live shows at most large venues since the 1980s allows photographers with press passes to shoot the first three songs at the front of the stage or in the aisles and then must leave the venue. This is primarily as the record companies and publicists don't want their artists to be captured looking sweaty and with their hair out of place. Of course it also takes away from the real atmosphere of a concert as you can guarantee it will be the fourth song when the artist gets into their groove.

    When shooting concerts with swirling, flashing lights and, particularly with black musicians, getting the best from film is very important. In order to get the best exposure, I always have the camera exposure setting on manual over-ride. I'll normally uprate the film to 800 or 1600 ASA and with black and white film you can always compensate in the darkroom and the added graininess gives a more contrasty gritty image that I prefer as well.

    Henri Cartier-Bresson's term "The Decisive Moment" is one that most photographers will be familiar with. It is a great feeling when you know you have got the picture after pressing the shutter. Then of course you hope that it is in focus and that the exposure is correct! That was the case with this image. It was difficult to get Salt, Pepa and DJ Spinderella all in one frame as Spinderella was normally behind the decks. Fortunately, during the third number she came to the front and the trio did some  choreographed moves with their male dancers. It meant being patient and hoping to get all of their heads visible and, despite a lot of dry ice, I knew that I had my shot once I pressed the shutter.

    See David Corio's other images in Who Shot Rock & Roll, currently showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography. To learn more about the photographer and his work visit his official website.

  • /the-shot-blog/portugal-man-who-shot-rock-roll-live

    Who Shot Rock & Roll: Live continued over the weekend with the second of three concerts we are presenting with KCRW - and what a show it was! The night served to bring people together to celebrate music and photography  as well as commemorate the 40th anniversary of T. Rex's influential album The Slider - all for free! Portugal. The Man put on an amazing show - one that people were still talking about days afterward.

    Droves of people filled the park outside of the Annenberg Space for Photography.

    Everyone was in good spirits at this all ages show. Some adults even let out their more youthful and care-free side.

    There was a line to enter to see the Who Shot Rock & Roll photography exhibit all day long.

    One of the exhibit's featured photographers, Ed Colver, who also attended the Moby concert earlier this month, showed up with his lovely wife Karin.

    Before the show, the members of Portugal. The Man came up to the Annenberg Foundation to play for a live televised news segment.

    KCRW DJs Dan Wilcox & Gary Calamar began the entertainment part of the night by spinning some records.

    The crowd had a good time listening to music...

    ...and dancing!

    A concertgoer proudly shows off his newly purchased Who Shot Rock & Roll t-shirt!

    Portugal. The Man came on stage shortly after 8 o'clock playing their own songs as well as covers of T. Rex tunes.

    The band has even compiled their own YouTube video playlist inspired by the exhibit.

    The crowd - really energized by the music!

    The band ended their fantastic hour and a half-long set with a lively rendition of the Beatles' "Hey Jude."

    Thanks to everyone who came out to this magical night to enjoy rock & roll images and rock & roll music. Our third (and final!) show in the free concert series with Band of Skulls & Raphael Saadiq will be Saturday, August 4. Find more information about that night here.

    (All images by Unique Nicole for the Space)

  • /the-shot-blog/henry-rollins-rocks-iris-nights

    It was an honor to have Henry Rollins take part in IRIS Nights last night. Rollins spoke about his travels around the globe and the photographs he took of the different people and cultures during those trips. The Photography Space was packed - standing room only! One of those in the crowd was featured photographer, Ed Colver, whose photo of Rollins greets visitors as on an oversized layover on the front door of our building.

    Rollins, Colver, and his giant image of the rocker on the door in the same place at the same time? That's a rare moment so there was only one thing we could do: post-lecture, we had Rollins and Colver pose in front of the door and we got the cool shot above!

    We'll have Rollins' lecture on our site soon and Colver himself will take the IRIS Nights stage in September.

    Photo by Unique Nicole for the Space.

  • /the-shot-blog/rundown-saturdays-concert

    Our free summer concert series,Who Shot Rock & Roll: Live, which we are presenting in conjunction with KCRW continues this Saturday, July 21st, with Portugal. The Man (yes, that additional period is their own). The band will perform live to celebrate the 40th anniversary of album The Slider by T. Rex, who were one of their early influences. Taking place just outside of the Annenberg Space for Photography, the event will also feature DJs Dan Wilcox and Gary Calamar spinning before Portugal. The Man's performance.

    Please note that attendees will be granted entry on a first-come, first-served basis until we hit capacity. RSVP does not guarantee entry. If you are coming in a large group, we recommend that everyone show up at the venue together. We can only accommodate the first 4,000 guests. One wristband per person will be distributed at check-in. No ins & outs, including access to your car in the garage, are allowed.

    Additionally, chairs, umbrellas, pets are not allowed into the venue. There will be food carts available for purchase and a beer garden will be open for those who are 21+. No outside beverages or alcohol are allowed but you are welcome to bring your own food and picnic blankets. Please note, these purchases are also cash only. Restaurants in the complex that will be open to provide food include Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, Habanero Grill, Piknic, Sen Asian Kitchen, and The Stand.

    The general public will be able to visit the galleries of the Photography Space to see Who Shot Rock & Roll from 11am - 5pm on Saturday without having to wear a wristband. After 5pm, the Space will only be accessible to those visitors who are wearing a wristband as a concertgoer. As a bonus, those guests will be able to enjoy the exhibit through 11pm.

    Self-parking in the underground garage at Century Park is a flat rate of $1. You must bring cash and pay upon entry. If the underground parking is closed when you arrive, this means the concert is already at capacity. Therefore, we strongly advise against finding alternate parking in the area.

    Who Shot Rock & Roll: Live is a free concert series created by the Annenberg Foundation and KCRW to benefit the community. The Foundation supports the arts as part of its mission to share ideas and knowledge. The Annenberg Foundation and KCRW encourage you to continue to support the arts.

    Follow both the Photography Space and KCRW on Twitter for real-time updates on capacity on the day of the show.

    Read all about Moby's amazing show last weekend, our first entry in this free concert series. Looking forward to celebrating rock & roll and photography with the community on Saturday - see you then!

  • /the-shot-blog/maripol-shot-rock-photographer-her-polaroid-madonna
     © Maripol, Madonna, Danceteria, New York City, 1983
    Maripol with son, Lino

    By Maripol

    When I arrived in New York from France, still fresh from the École des Beaux-Arts school of arts, I didn’t have a clue what an artist was supposed to do. Being a girl, I loved fashion and I loved to make accessories. I also really loved to snap photos with my Polaroid SX 70 camera. It was pretty much like my clutch bag.

    I first met Madonna one night in 1983, a time when the music scene was amidst change: disco had just died, Hip-hop and rap were on the rise and clubs like the Roxy and Danceteria were showcasing a great mix of performers.

    On that night, Fab 5 Freddy was about to take the stage at the Roxy and he asked me to recruit some cute girls to dance with him up on stage. I spotted Madonna, whom I knew from the city’s club scene, hanging out with my good friend Jean-Michel Basquiat. I asked her if she was wearing a nice bra and if she minded taking her top off to dance on stage. She thought I was out of my mind…and the rest is history.

    I shot this Polaroid right before Madonna’s own performance in 1983 - at Danceteria. She was very young but just as gorgeous as she still is today. There is only one Polaroid like it that captures this moment. I love the way she looks at me and also love seeing her lips through the glass while she drank (her favorite drink was a dry Martini). The cigarette in the photo is not lit. We all smoked back then but we also liked them for attitude.

    The image captures a couple of my fixations: fashion & accessories – all with another love of mine: my Polaroid camera.

    I am delighted to share this private moment in such a great show like Who Shot Rock & Roll with the public.

    See More of Maripol's images in Who Shot Rock & Roll, showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography through October 7, 2012. Learn more about her on her official website.

  • /the-shot-blog/coming-space-saturday-read-first

    You may have heard by now, but just in case you haven't, we're having a little concert series on three separate Saturdays ths summer. Our concert on July 16 will feature Moby, July 21 Portugal. The Man, and August 4th, both Raphael Saadiq & Band of Skulls. In order to gain access to the show on those nights, concertgoers will be required to wear wristbands.

    However, the general public will be able to visit the galleries of the Photography Space to take in Who Shot Rock & Roll without a wristband but only from 11am - 5pm on those Saturdays. After 5pm, the Space and its galleries will only be accessible to those visitors who are wearing a wristband as a concertgoer. As a bonus, those guests will be able to enjoy the exhibit through 11pm those nights.

    So if you don't plan to watch the concert, come early! That way you'll avoid all of the crowds. See you at the Space!

  • /the-shot-blog/our-free-moby-concert-saturday

    We're excited for this Saturday's Who Shot Rock & Roll: Live concert with Moby! KCRW's Jason Bentley will be DJing on stage that night, too. It's going to be a real fun night. Whether you're coming to the Space to see the photography exhibit or just the concert, here's a quick rundown of some important info you'll need for that day.

    For those of you who have re-confirmed your RSVP for this event through KCRW, please note that attendees will be granted entry on a first-come, first-served basis until we hit capacity. We are only able to accommodate the first 4,000 guests. One wristband per person will be distributed at check-in. Concert check-in begins at 5pm and the show will take place from 7:00pm - 10pm. 

    No outside food & beverage is allowed but most of the restaurants in the park will be open, including Piknic, Craft, The Stand, Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. There will also be a beer garden for those who are over the age of 21. No chairs, umbrellas, pets, or outside food & beverage (including alcohol) are allowed into the venue.

    The general public will be able to visit the galleries of the Photography Space to see Who Shot Rock & Roll from 11am - 5pm on Saturday without having to wear a wristband. After 5pm, the Space will only be accessible to those visitors who are wearing a wristband as a concertgoer. As a bonus, those guests will be able to enjoy the exhibit through 11pm.

    Self-parking in the underground garage at Century Park is a flast rate of $1. You must bring cash and pay upon entry.

    Who Shot Rock & Roll: Live is a free concert series created by the Annenberg Foundation and KCRW to benefit the community. The Foundation supports the arts as part of its mission to share ideas and knowledge. The Foundation and KCRW encourage you to copntinue to support the arts.

    Follow the Photography Space and KCRW on Twitter for real-time updates on capacity on the day of the show. See you then!

  • /the-shot-blog/jill-furmanovsky-shoots-rising-new-star

    By Jill Furmanovsky

    Musician Johnny Borrell of Razorlight was the first person to tell me about Florence Welch of Florence + The Machine. He was very impressed with her way back in 2007 and they worked on a few demos together. Johnny invited me to attend a rehearsal at John Henry's rehearsal studio in North London where the two, together with a small backing band, were working on an arrangement for what became "Throwing Bricks."

    Florence was a charismatic presence even then. She had that huge voice which filled the room, and as she sang she beat the shit out of a snare drum to illustrate the anger and rage of a song about a woman who builds a man brick by brick and then he becomes stronger than her - an extraordinary song.

     The lighting was nasty - florescent tubes with just a glimmer of daylight through a small window. I took my position to the side of Florence to get a plain background and used the highest shutter speed possible. Her hair was flying and her hands a blur.  Over and over again the four musicians worked on this song and recorded it finally on an old Sony tape recorder.

    When I came to edit the shoot I went for the image up top of her in full flow, barely sharp. To make it more powerful I cropped out the drums and the microphone which took the image out of context leaving a simpler image - one that reflects the unleashed raw power of a great rock singer giving it her all. 

    Some hours later Florence and Johnny left the studio on Johnny's motor bike. Florence sat on the back, one hand hanging on to Johnny, the other clutching the tape player to her head and swaying dangerously as they rode away.  It is entirely just that she has gone on to become a rising new star.

    See more of Jill Furmanovsky's images in Who Shot Rock & Roll, showing at the Annenberg Space for Photography through October 7, 2012. Learn more about Jill on her website, www.rockarchive.com.

    Above three images: Florence Welch rehearsing at John Henry's Oct 2007, © Jill Furmanovsky / www.rockarchive.com  - Florence Welch rehearsing at John Henry's Oct 2007

  • /the-shot-blog/bob-gruen-debbie-harry

    Max’s Kansas City was opened by Mickey Ruskin on Park Avenue in New York City in the 1960’s.  It soon became a hangout for artists, including Andy Warhol, whose studio was nearby, and Debbie Harry, who worked as a waitress at the club. In the early 1970's Mickey left and Tommy Dean reopened Max’s as a hangout for rock & roll bands and their followers. Blondie played there - often opening for the New York Dolls and later as headliners. 

    This photo of mine shows Debbie Harry, lead singer of Blondie, at Max’s in July 1976.  Debbie recently told me she made the dress herself from a pillow case she found on the street. The somewhat military-like hat she’s wearing in this photo was meant to dramatize a song with some German lyrics that she sang in a Marlene Dietrich-like style.

    See this image and more in Who Shot Rock & Roll: The Film, part of the Who Shot Rock & Roll photography exhibit running at the Annenberg Space for Photography now through October 7, 2012.

    Photo: © Bob Gruen. Debbie Harry at Max's Kansas City in New York, NY, 1976.

  • /the-shot-blog/i-shot-rock-show-us-what-you-got

    Have you shot rock & roll? If so, we want to see your photos!

    Upload your own rock photos to Instagram, hashtag them #IShotRock and see them on the official campaign's feed here.

    We want to see your concert photos, musician photos, etc and if one of your good friends happens to be a well-known grammy-winning musician, even a private portrait of him or her would be great.

    The Annenberg Space for Photography has partnered with KCRW with this project which is all part of the Who Shot Rock & Roll photography exhibition. You might have also heard about the three part free concert series we are collaborating on with them this summer. Click here for those details.

    So take to Instagram with I Shot Rock and show us what you got!

Pages

Copyright © 2014. The Annenberg Space for Photography. All rights reserved.
Privacy & Accessibility Statement
Sitemap